Programs

Learn About Our Evidence-Based Programs

The Tulsa Health Department’s Personal Responsibility Education Program [PREP] works with schools in Tulsa County, especially those that have the highest teen birth rates, in an effort to influence change and increase education.  PREP offers evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs identified by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of Adolescent Health (OAH) and selected by the Oklahoma State Department of Health. 

PREP staff works directly with school leaders to select the program that fits best with the students in each school. For more information and to find out how your school can become involved with PREP please contact the PREP Supervisor at (918) 595-4467 or send us an email.

What Does "Evidence-Based" Mean?

According to the Office of Adolescent Health, "while definitions vary, evidence-based programs generally indicate those interventions and activities that evaluations have shown to be effective at addressing a particular outcome. Evidence-based programs are not “one-size fits all.” Evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs reflect great diversity on characteristics including program approach, target population, implementation setting, length of the program, program outcomes, and length of program outcomes."

Power to Decide, the Campaign to Prevent Unplanned Pregnancy, says this, "Many programs claim to be evidence-based, but not all evidence is created equal. All models on the HHS evidence list must meet well-recognized high standards of evidence—they must have been evaluated using a randomized controlled trial or quasi-experimental design. These evaluations must demonstrate actual changes in behavior (not just knowledge or behavioral intent), and results must be published in a peer-reviewed journal. The list of models that meet this high standard contains a variety of approaches, including abstinence-only programs and those that address both abstinence and contraception. The TPP Program is one of the few government programs that both uses evidence as criteria for funding decisions and continues to rigorously evaluate its efforts and results. Few federal programs are backed by such strong evidence."

 

Making Proud Choices

Making Proud Choices! An Evidence-Based, Safer-Sex Approach to Teen Pregnancy and HIV/STD Prevention (MPC) gives teens the information, skills and confidence to protect themselves from unplanned pregnancy, HIV and other STDs. It empowers young people to change their behaviors and lower their risks by abstaining from sex or by using latex condoms if they choose to have sex.

MPC uses DVDs, games, brainstorming, roleplaying, skill-building activities and small-group discussions. It helps adolescents understand how to make healthy decisions to protect themselves.

MPC helps young people:

  • Increase their knowledge of HIV, other STDs and pregnancy prevention. ·

  • Believe in the value of abstinence and other safer-sex practices. ·

  • Improve their ability to negotiate abstinence or safer-sex practices. ·

  • Take pride in choosing responsible sexual behaviors.

    Does MPC encourage young people to have sex?

    No, MPC does not encourage sexual activity. It stresses that delaying sex until a later age is the best way to avoid unplanned pregnancy, HIV and other STDs. It encourages young people to build healthy relationships so they can talk with a partner about the decision to abstain or practice safer sex. It provides information about how to prevent pregnancy, HIV and other STDs to help young people avoid these risks if and when they choose to have sex.

    Making Proud Choices is typically offered to high school students. 

     

    Making a Difference

    Making a Difference! An Evidence-Based, Abstinence Approach to Teen Pregnancy and HIV/STD Prevention (MAD) is an 8-module curriculum that provides young adolescents with the knowledge, confidence and skills necessary to reduce their risk of sexually transmitted diseases, HIV and pregnancy by abstaining from sex.

    MAD uses DVDs, games, brainstorming, roleplaying, skill-building activities and small-group discussions. It helps adolescents understand how to make healthy decisions to protect themselves.

    The goals of the Making a Difference! program are to:

  • Help young people change behaviors that place them at risk for HIV, STDs and pregnancy.

  • Delay the initiation of sex among sexually inexperienced youth.

  • Reduce unprotected sex among sexually active youth.

  • Help young people make proud and responsible decisions about their sexual behaviors.

    Does MAD encourage young people to have sex?

    No, MAD does not encourage sexual activity. It stresses that delaying sex until a later age is the best way to avoid unplanned pregnancy, HIV and other STDs. It encourages young people to build healthy relationships so they can talk with a partner about the decision to abstain from sex. It provides information about how to prevent pregnancy, HIV and other STDs to help young people avoid these risks by choosing abstinence.

    Making a Difference is typically offered to middle school students.

     

    Positive Prevention PLUS

    Positive Prevention PLUS (PP+) is a 12-lesson curriculum that addresses risk factors and behaviors associated with unplanned teen pregnancy by increasing adolescent's ability to use risk-reduction skills including contraceptive use, resistance and negotiation skills, and accessing reproductive health services. There are programs for both Middle School and for High School students. Each curriculum stands independently and is not required as a mandatory set.

    The program seeks to teach adolescents to either delay/abstain from sexual activity or use birth control consistently and correctly when engaging in sexual activity:

  • Knowledge of the consequences of teen pregnancy and risk situations, contraception and health services

  • Self-efficacy to use birth control and condoms

  • Parent-adolescent communication

  • Refusal skills

  • Positive attitudes toward abstinence

    Positive Prevention PLUS has two program designs - one typically offered to middle school students and the other offered to high school students. 

    Love Notes

    Love Notes EBP is a comprehensive healthy relationship education curriculum that teaches adolescents and young adults (14-24) how to build healthy romantic relationships, prevent dating violence, and improve impulse control. The program is designed to build young people's skills for cultivating healthy relationships, selves, and sexual behaviors: planning and pacing relationships and sex, self-efficacy and resilience around relationships, proven communication skills, and understanding how family formation impacts children.

    Love Notes is delivered through facilitation, PowerPoints, group discussions, exercises, workbooks, videos, music videos, brainstorming, worksheets, role-play activities, drawing, and sculpting.

    The main goals of the Love Notes program are to:

  • Prevent unplanned pregnancy by providing teens with information to make wise relationship choices.  

  • Provide clear information on preventing relationship violence.

  • Help teens create a clear plan to avoid pregnancy or STDs.

    Love Notes is typically offered to high school students as well as expectant and parenting young adults.

    Power Through Choices

    Power Through Choices (PTC) is a 10-session prevention curriculum for adolescents, ages 13-18, living in out-of-home care. It has two main themes: self-empowerment and the impact of choices on an individual’s future. It is directed toward youth who reside in group homes, foster homes, kinship foster care, juvenile justice or other out-of-home care and is designed to help youth prevent teen pregnancy, HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

    The curriculum’s goal is to provide youth in out-of-home care with specific information and skills to help them avoid risk-taking sexual behaviors and reduce the incidence of adolescent pregnancy, HIV and other STIs. Curriculum objectives focus on enabling the participants to:

  • Make healthy, positive choices related to sexual behavior.

  • Build condom and contraceptive knowledge and skills.

  • Develop and practice effective communication skills.

  • Learn how to access available resources.

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Pregnancy Assistance Fund

About PAF

The Office of Adolescent Health’s Pregnancy Assistance Fund (PAF) Program is a $25 million per year competitive grant program that aims to improve the health, educational, social, and economic outcomes of expectant and parenting teens, women, fathers, and their families. Since 2010, OAH has provided funding to 32 states, including the District of Columbia, and 5 tribal organizations. Currently, 22 states and one tribal organization are funded through the PAF Program.

PAF Program grantees use funds to:

  • Establish, maintain, or operate expectant and parenting student services in high schools, community service centers, and/or Institutions of Higher Education
  • Improve services for pregnant women who are victims of domestic violence
  • Increase public awareness and education concerning the services available to expectant and parenting teens, women, fathers, and their families

As a result of the PAF Program, more than 76,000 expectant and parenting teens, women, fathers, and their families have received a wide range of support services related to personal health, child health, parenting, education, and employment, as well as concrete supports like diapers and baby equipment. Data collected through the PAF Performance Measures, shows that participants of the PAF Program have experienced many positive outcomes including improvements in high school graduation, acceptance into Institutions of Higher Education, reductions in dropping out of high school, and reductions in subsequent unintended pregnancies.

PAF Project Description

The Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) will work in the state’s two major metropolitan areas, Oklahoma City and Tulsa, to serve expectant and parenting teens. OSDH will partner with the Oklahoma Office of Juvenile Affairs (OJA) to reach expectant and parenting teens, women, fathers and their families who are currently or have recently been incarcerated. OJA will use a program such as The Nurturing Parents Program in the facilities and communities served, and will contract with community-based service providers for programming and intensive case management to meet the participants’ needs.

OSDH will also partner with the Oklahoma City-County Health Department (OCCHD) and the Tulsa Health Department (THD) to implement the Love Notes teen pregnancy prevention curriculum, which emphasizes healthy relationship development and includes parenting skills. Finally, OCCHD will provide social service support to participants and their families to improve their educational, health, and social outcomes, and THD will increase public awareness of the services available to expectant and parenting teens, women, fathers, and their families in the community.

PAF Settings: High Schools, Community Service Centers, Institutions of Higher Education, Juvenile Justice

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